Who Would Have Thought That Hot Wheels Cars Could Fetch You This Much Money?

Published on 11/03/2020
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Do you remember what your childhood was like? For us, it meant watching a lot of Saturday morning cartoons, eating sugary cereals for breakfast, and playing with Hot Wheels. Matchbox had absolutely nothing on these toy cars that came out in 1968. Hot Wheels remain hugely popular even to this day! The toys have been around for five decades, and quite a number of them are now collectors’ items. This is your time to shine if you collected them back in the day. We hope that you kept them in good shape since you might be in for a lot of money. Just a side note, not all the photos on this list match the models but they all come from the same year!

Who Would Have Thought That Hot Wheels Cars Could Fetch You This Much Money

Who Would Have Thought That Hot Wheels Cars Could Fetch You This Much Money?

Rear-Loading Pink Beach Bomb From 1969 – $150,000

This is known as the King of Hot Wheels! The rear-loading pink Beach Bomb model was introduced in 1969 and now has a value of $150,000. It was created as a prototype and was not made available to the public. Apparently, it did not make it to the production line since it was too top-heavy and narrow. The final version came with a sunroof and side-mounted surfboards. There are only two of these ever made!

$1 Million 'Hot Wheels' Toy Car Collection

Rear-Loading Pink Beach Bomb From 1969 – $150,000

Over Chrome Camaro From 1968 – $25,000

The 1968 Over Chrome Camaro came out in a lime color known as “antifreeze.” The over-chrome application of this color was very rare and primarily used in advertising. The car did not hit the stores and only appeared in commercials. The lime coating was rarely seen in those days, and the quality of this car was better than sales models. There are only twenty known Hot Wheels with the finish, and this is considered the most valuable of them all.

Over Chrome Camaro From 1968 - $25,000

Over Chrome Camaro From 1968 – $25,000

Mad Maverick From 1969 – $15,000

How can you call yourself a Hot Wheels aficionado if you do not know the Might Maverick? Even though Mad Maverick was the original name of the toy, Mattel had to change it after another toy manufacturer filed a copyright claim. The company renamed it Mighty Maverick right away, so the “Mad Maverick” copies are very valuable now. If you have one in mint condition, you might be sitting on $15,000. The nameplate at the bottom of the car is going to reveal whether you are one of the lucky ones.

Mad Maverick From 1969 - $15,000

Mad Maverick From 1969 – $15,000

Brown Custom Charger From 1969 – $13,000

If you want to get $13,000 for this model, the model should be brown and have a white interior. The Hot Wheels Custom Charger was among the most commonly produced models from 1968 to 1971. However, the brown one was pretty rare. A lot of collectors even believe that it was made as a prototype thanks to its rarity. A mere handful of them are known to exist, so you are in luck if you own one of them.

Brown Custom Charger From 1969 - $13,000

Brown Custom Charger From 1969 – $13,000

Purple Oldsmobile From 1971 – $12,000

The models made during the first decade of Hot Wheels have been deemed “redline.” The term is used thanks to the red line that the company added to the tires. This practice stopped in 1978. A purple 1971 Oldsmobile 442 is considered to be the rarest of these models. You can get $12,000 or so for one of them! It is important to note that the purple color is part of what makes it so valuable. The legendary toy was exclusively made at the Mattel facility in Hong Kong.

Purple Oldsmobile From 1971 - $12,000

Purple Oldsmobile From 1971 – $12,000

Ed Shaver Blue AMX From 1969 – $10,000

This was a United Kingdom model that was created after Mattel struck a sponsorship deal with racer Ed Shaver. The 1969 Blue AMX is now worth $10,000. It is a standard AMX, but the graphics on the vehicle sets it apart from the rest. This means that only the units with the Ed Shaver decals are considered one of the most valuable Hot Wheels units in the world! If this is not the case, we want to congratulate you on having a nice-looking model. However, it simply is not worth a lot of money.

Ed Shaver Blue AMX From 1969 - $10,000

Ed Shaver Blue AMX From 1969 – $10,000

Brown ’31 Woody From 1969 – $8,000

Collectors believe that there are fewer than twelve brown ’31 Woodys in the world right now. This number includes prototypes already, so it is a very rare and valuable car. We are jealous of you if you own one of them! But you have to ensure that the car is not actually orange. A lot of the ’31 Woodys originally painted orange have since darkened, which is the reason that they look more like brown.

Brown '31 Woody From 1969 - $8,000

Brown ’31 Woody From 1969 – $8,000

Python Body With Cheetah Base From 1969 – $6,000

The Hot Wheels Python was originally called the Hot Wheels Cheetah when Mattel was designing and creating it. This model took inspiration from the Dream Road by Bill Cushenbery of Kustom Kulture. However, it was renamed before it hit the market. Even so, some Pythons sold had the original base nameplate that said Cheetah! You might make an instant $6,000 if you happen to own one of these babies. This might be what you need to finally go on the vacation of your dreams!

Python Body With Cheetah Base From 1969 - $6,000

Python Body With Cheetah Base From 1969 – $6,000

Spectralflame Bye Focal In Purple From 1971 – $6,000

Hot Wheels wanted to make this particular iconic collectible difficult to identify. In 1971, Mattel used a couple of Bye Focal shades like purple, magenta, and blue to make the Spectralflame. You need one of the purple editions in mint condition if you want to bring home $6,000. This item is hard to find since the model tends to go into a “crumbling” condition! For one reason or another, the Spectralflame often developed cracks and started to crumble at a rate faster than other models in the Hot Wheels lineup.

Spectralflame Bye Focal In Purple From 1971 - $6,000

Spectralflame Bye Focal In Purple From 1971 – $6,000

Red Ferrari With White Interior From 1970 – $5,000

The white interior is what makes the red Ferrari 312P unique. This toy went into mass production in the ‘70s, and the vast majority of them had a black interior like the one in the photo. You might not think that anyone would bat an eye at this, but one with a light interior is now worth $5,000. Mattel made this car in Hong Kong and the United States. The model was one of the most famous models during that era!

Red Ferrari With White Interior From 1970 - $5,000

Red Ferrari With White Interior From 1970 – $5,000

Pink Beatnik Bandit From 1968 – $5,000

In 1968, the Beatnik Bandit was introduced as part of the Hot Wheels Sweet Sixteen set. These cars were the original launch models of the Mattel brand! Among them, the Beatnik bandit is worth the most money. If you want to sell it for $5,000, you should have the pink version. After all, that was the rarest of all the eighteen options that the toy was made in. This was based on an Ed “Big Daddy” Roth design.

Pink Beatnik Bandit From 1968 - $5,000

Pink Beatnik Bandit From 1968 – $5,000

Red Oldsmobile With Black Interior From 1971 – $4,000

While it is not as valuable as the purple Olds 442, the red ones are still considered rare. In fact, you might bring home $4,000 if you have the one with a black interior. This car is worth a lot of money since they were made in small amounts. This is one of the most difficult redline Hot Wheel models to find right now! It has also led collectors to the conclusion that it was just a prototype and never made it to the market.

Red Oldsmobile With Black Interior From 1971 - $4,000

Red Oldsmobile With Black Interior From 1971 – $4,000

Green Open Fire – $4,000

The green Open Fire is based on what many people consider to be one of the worst cars in history! It was basically a stretched version of an AMC Gremlin. The car came with six wheels and an engine protruding from the hood. This classic Hot Wheel model is now worth $4,000. In the ‘70s, it was said to have helped the push towards cheaper and smaller cars! This was part of the era that introduced “pet rocks, shag carpets, platform shoes and the AMC Gremlin.”

Green Open Fire - $4,000

Green Open Fire – $4,000

Red Baron With White Interior From 1969 – $3,500

We do not blame you if you are surprised to find this on the list! The 1969 Red Baron is one of the most popular and recognizable Hot Wheels cars out there, after all. However, this is not just any Red Baron unit that we are talking about. The most important part here is the interior. Ost of the Red Barons came with black interiors. Only a few of them were made with white interiors. You are in for $3,500 or so if you held onto a copy of this rare model!

Red Baron With White Interior From 1969 - $3,500

Red Baron With White Interior From 1969 – $3,500

Blue Rodger Dodger From 1974 – $3,000

When the Blue Rodger Dodger was introduced in 1974, it did not get much fanfare. There was a limited number of these cars made, so it was valuable thanks to its rarity. On the bright side, you should consider yourself lucky if you own one of them since good ones now go for $3,000. The color is important here, and blue is the magic shade. Your blue 1974 Rodger Dodger should be original as well since Mattel made a retooled iteration of it in both 2000 and 2015.

Blue Rodger Dodger From 1974 - $3,000

Blue Rodger Dodger From 1974 – $3,000

White Z-Whiz From 1977 – $3,000

In 1977, Hot Wheels introduced the Z-Whiz model. This was based on the Datsun Z, which made it the first toy car based on a Japanese import. Do you own a white Z-Whiz in good condition? We are glad to inform you that you might soon have $3,000! Hot Wheels discontinued this motel in 1984, so it was only in production for seven years. Green was the most common color, and early models were released in silver. At any rate, white is the one that you should be looking for.

White Z-Whiz From 1977 - $3,000

White Z-Whiz From 1977 – $3,000

White Custom Camaro From 1968 – $3,000

Here is another important car in the history of Hot Wheels! Collectors say that the 1968 Custom Camaro was the first one to change from concept to production. Mattel gave it a white enamel finish and wanted to change its colors before it hit the stores. In the end, a couple of white cars still found its way to the shelves. This means that the white ones from that year were the first “collectible” Hot Wheels!

White Custom Camaro From 1968 - $3,000

White Custom Camaro From 1968 – $3,000

Brown Custom Camaro From 1968 – $3,000

This is the same model as the one before, but the difference lies in the color. The brown exterior and white interior combo is considered valuable and rare! It was not supposed to be available to the general public either. Rumor has it that this was delivered to stores as a supposed display model. You are lucky if you have one of these cars in your collection since you can trade it in for $3,000. For this to happen, however, it must be in good condition and follow the aforementioned color combination.

Brown Custom Camaro From 1968 - $3,000

Brown Custom Camaro From 1968 – $3,000

Strawberry Over Chrome Mustang From 1968 – $40,000

The 1968 Hot Wheels Strawberry Over Chrome Mustang is considered valuable since it did not enter the market. This was exclusively made for advertising! There were two models made, but it ended up in a mobile home for some reason. Once the homeowner passed away, the car went for $40,000. The Over Chrome Cars are generally considered special since they sold like pancakes when they hit the shelves! The Strawberry version is one of the rarest of them all, which explains why it is worth so much money.

Strawberry Over Chrome Mustang From 1968 - $40,000

Strawberry Over Chrome Mustang From 1968 – $40,000

Magenta Rodger Dodger With White Interior From 1974 – $2,500

This is the second Rodger Dodger to be featured on the list! The magenta one is worth as much as $2,500. Just like the blue version, this has a special place in the hearts of collectors. Before you sell it, however, you should make sure that it is the genuine original instead of the retooled versions. This model was based on the Dodge Charger SE released in 1973 and designed by Larry Wood. It did not have a huge engine peeking out of the hood since it would have been impossible to drive otherwise.

Magenta Rodger Dodger With White Interior From 1974 - $2,500

Magenta Rodger Dodger With White Interior From 1974 – $2,500

Pink Superfine Turbine From 1974 – $2,500

Up next, we have another classic Larry Wood design. The Superfine Turbine was a new Hot Wheels casting from 1973. The cars are difficult to find, especially those that come in pink. They were only in production for a year! Hot Wheels did not reissue and retool this model under the HWC Neo Classics series. This is why you can sell a pink 1974 Superfine Turbine for $2,500 in this day and age.

Pink Superfine Turbine From 1974 - $2,500

Pink Superfine Turbine From 1974 – $2,500

Diamond Encrusted Hot Wheel From 2008 – $140,000

Are you ready to meet the most outrageous car in the Hot Wheels lineup? This diamond-encrusted car was made to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the brand! Jason Areshehen was the celebrity jeweler commissioned for its design. He layered it in 18 carat white gold. Recording artist Nick Lachay presented this glorious car at the American International Toy Fair and auctioned it off to raise funds for Big Brothers Big Sisters charity. It also had a case of 40 white diamonds to go with the celebration.

Diamond Encrusted Hot Wheel From 2008 - $140,000

Diamond Encrusted Hot Wheel From 2008 – $140,000

Poison Pinto From 1976 – $150

To be entirely fair, this one does not command the same price as the other entries on our list. Even so, it is still worth more money than the vast majority of Hot Wheels out there. It is notable for that very reason. The original version was for sale from 1976 to 1985! The company released a retooled version in the ‘00s, but the vintage one was still better. It came out in shades like red, chrome, dark blue, and teal.

Poison Pinto From 1976 - $150

Poison Pinto From 1976 – $150

Funny Car Collector No. 271 From 1995 – $2,800

This Hot Wheels car once went for about $7,000 online. However, the general auction price-point of this piece is $2,800. It is so special since they were made in small quantities in 1995! The truth is that there are no more than twelve Funny Car Collector No. 271 in the world right now. Only half of them have gotten a Hot Wheels verification, so they are worth even more money. Best of luck if you want one.

Funny Car Collector No. 271 From 1995 - $2,800

Funny Car Collector No. 271 From 1995 – $2,800

Python With Cheetah Base From 1968 – $5,200

Isn’t it amazing to learn that the price-point of this classic is $5,200? That is a serious amount of money, but people are willing to pay for it for a variety of reasons. The 1968 Python was based on a car known as “Dream Rod.” This eventually evolved into “Tiger Shark.” Fun fact: the first make of the car came with CHEETAH printed on its base! You will find that they are difficult to come across. Hot Wheels have not verified many of them.

Python With Cheetah Base From 1968 - $5,200

Python With Cheetah Base From 1968 – $5,200

Custom Volkswagen Beetle Without Sunroof From 1968 – $1,600

It feels like every single person on the planet likes the Volkswagen Beetle! That might not be totally true, but this has not stopped this model from being one of the most expensive Hot Wheel models out there. The first batch was made in Hong Kong. They did not have a blue-tinted sunroof and were just smooth. In 1974, manufacturers reissued the no-sunroof style. Only the original ones are worth a lot of money.

Custom Volkswagen Beetle Without Sunroof From 1968 - $1,600

Custom Volkswagen Beetle Without Sunroof From 1968 – $1,600

Ed Shaver Custom From 1970 – $4,000

We have already talked about a 1969 Ed Shaver earlier. Those remain the rarest version of this series, although there are other notable ones as well. Many of those cars have a value in the hundred dollars, but only a couple of them are worth more than that. According to appraiser Mike Zarnock, they are available through cereal mail-in. If you own one of these, you might just be in for a whopping $4,000.

Ed Shaver Custom From 1970 - $4,000

Ed Shaver Custom From 1970 – $4,000

The Mystery Machine – $80

You must recognize the same car that the Scooby gang cruised around in! This was Fred’s van and served as the primary mode of transport of the gang. Hot Wheels added the Mystery Machine to its lineup in 2012, but those made in 2017 are worth even more money than the original. Aside from that, Hot Wheels also made the Scooby-Doo Zoinks punch. This is a great deal if you are a big fan of the show.

The Mystery Machine - $80

The Mystery Machine – $80

Hot Wheels Spider-Man Van From 1979 – $50

Who doesn’t adore the web-slinging hero? Hot Wheels decided to make a van to honor the superhero! Known as the Spiderman Shredster, it is not going to make you a rich man. Even so, it still makes for an awesome piece of memorabilia that you can boast about to your friends. You might even have one of these in the attic or the basement. It is worth checking since $50 is still more money than nothing at all!

Hot Wheels Spider-Man Van From 1979 - $50

Hot Wheels Spider-Man Van From 1979 – $50

Frito Lay Delivery Van From 1984 – $149

Hot Wheels only had a one-year contract with Frito-Lay, which explains why there are so few of this model in existence. The Delivery Van was released in 1984. People could only get them in certain packs. Sadly, Hot Wheels ended up changing its name to Combat Medic once the contract came to an end in 1986. It then renamed it Delivery Truck three years later. Fun fact: the back can be opened up.

Frito Lay Delivery Van From 1984 - $149

Frito Lay Delivery Van From 1984 – $149

Back To The Future DeLorean From 2011 – $76

One of the greatest cars in film history has a Hot Wheels model of its own! Hot Wheels released the DeLorean from the sci-fi classic in 2011. This model has been upgraded many times since then. The first models had DMC on the front and the word OUTATIME on the back. There are plenty of versions of this car, and each one fetches a different price. You can make anywhere from $5 to a few hundred bucks!

Back To The Future DeLorean From 2011 - $76

Back To The Future DeLorean From 2011 – $76

Hot Wheels Ecto-1A From 2010 – $$$

While Ghostbusters came out in 1984, Hot Wheels only made a car for it in 2010. There are three different types of this model but let us talk about the 2010 Ecto-1A. Depending on the condition of the unit, it can go anywhere from a couple of hundred bucks to thousands of dollars! On the other hand, the second most popular one happens to be the 2015 Hot Wheels Ecto-1 Ghostbusters Cartoon Car.

Hot Wheels Ecto-1A From 2010 - $$$

Hot Wheels Ecto-1A From 2010 – $$$

K.I.T.T. From 2012 – $$$

You are looking at a vehicle based on a popular TV show called Knight Rider. The initials are short for Knight Industries Two Thousand. It was a 1982 Pontiac Trans Am equipped with AI. The first version was designed by Brendon Vetuskey and came out in 2012. The car has different scales that ranged from 1/43 to 1/18, each one carrying different qualities. If you are looking to make a lot of money, we hope that you have the 1/18 version. It is worth more money since it has the coolest tricks!

K.I.T.T. From 2012 - $$$

K.I.T.T. From 2012 – $$$

#001 Batmobile From 2004 – $$$

It probably does not come as a shock that Batman cars are popular in the Hot Wheels community. They have sleek features that make them even more exciting for the collectors! There are two models that are considered very rare. We are talking about the Scale Limited Comic-Con Edition and the 2004 #001 Batmobile. You can only get a few hundred bucks for them at most, but they are still worthy models.

#001 Batmobile From 2004 - $$$

#001 Batmobile From 2004 – $$$

GMC Motorhome From 1977 – $355

Hot Wheels debuted the GMC Motorhome under its Flying Colors series. It was designed by Larry Wood and Bob Rosas in 1977. The later got in touch with GMC to ask for permission to do this. The automaker only agreed in exchange for 30 gold versions! Those are now worth a few thousand bucks, but they were given to sales representatives and are hard to find. You might have better luck looking for the originals.

GMC Motorhome From 1977 - $355

GMC Motorhome From 1977 – $355

’38 Ford C.O.E. Truck From 1998 – ~$70

All right, it has a pretty low price at the moment, but we are sure that the autographed Larry Wood truck is going to be worth more money in the future. Hot Wheels released the original version in 1998 and kept it in production until 2009. This came with airstream flatbed, airstream trailers, box, and flatbed versions. There are a dozen or so different types of the model. Even though he did not always hit the mark, Larry Wood was a generally amazing designer.

'38 Ford C.O.E. Truck From 1998 - ~$70

’38 Ford C.O.E. Truck From 1998 – ~$70

Larry Wood World Tour Purple VW Bug Beetle Limited From 1989 – $$$

This is another lovely piece by Larry Wood. The World Tour Volkswagen Bug Beetle Limited in purple is a true masterpiece. We are sure that it would stand out as soon as you see it in the showroom. Wood made it to resemble the Hong Kong cast in 1989. If you own a copy of this, you would not want to remove it from the box! Wood signed it as well. This is now celebrating more than 30 years of existence.

Larry Wood World Tour Purple VW Bug Beetle Limited From 1989 - $$$

Larry Wood World Tour Purple VW Bug Beetle Limited From 1989 – $$$

1967 Corvette Pro Street From 2002 – $$$

You just know that it is a special car when the model is seen only four times before its discontinuation. This was what happened to the 1967 Corvette Pro Street, which came out in 2002. How on earth is it possible to resist this supercharger with its flames and oversized rear wheels? On top of that, the hood gives the user the opportunity to see its power since it can open up. What a nifty little feature!

1967 Corvette Pro Street From 2002 - $$$

1967 Corvette Pro Street From 2002 – $$$

The Demon From 1970 – $$$

The Hot Wheel model is known as the Demon. Released in 1970, it was based on a custom 1932 Ford by Dave Stuckey. It goes for a lot of money! You might score one of these beauties if you have a few hundred dollars to spare. The interior is typically black, but there is a magenta model with a white interior as well! That one is considered very rare, so you should be ready to spend a lot of money if you were interested in acquiring one of them. This model was eventually renamed Prowler.

The Demon From 1970 - $$$

The Demon From 1970 – $$$

Spiderman Shredster From 1979 – $$$

Check it out! We have another Spiderman car on the list. The Spiderman Shredster comes from the Heroes line. It is also considered to be a special product since they were only in production from 1979 to 1984. Larry Wood was the man behind this design as well! This is more valuable than the Spidey-Van from earlier. The inside did not get any paint, although the windows came in red. There is also a type with orange windows! At any rate, it is only available in black.

Spiderman Shredster From 1979 - $$$

Spiderman Shredster From 1979 – $$$

Custom Camaro In Brown From 1968 – $3,000

Brown was previously one of the least liked and least developed colors for early Redlines, with the exception of the monumentally rare “Over Chrome” paint variants. The popular Custom Camaro casting was rarely seen in brown, with some collectors wanting to believe it was only used for advertising reasons. As a result, it’s unsurprising that one of these Hot Wheels is now among the most expensive to acquire, assuming you can find one.

Custom Camaro In Brown From 1968 $3,000

Custom Camaro In Brown From 1968 $3,000

Boss Hoss with Black Roof From 1971 – $1,050

Initially released in 1970 as a Hot Wheels Collectors Club mail-away club kit, the Boss Hoss was an enormous hit, prompting Matell to integrate it into their next production line.

Boss Hoss With Black Roof From 1971

Boss Hoss With Black Roof From 1971

Candy Striper Chevy Bel Air Gasser From 1955 – $1,400

The 1955 Candy Striper Chevrolet Bel Air Gasser Hot Wheels car is a 2014 Hot Wheels Collectors exclusive, limited to just 4,000 units. These vehicles are collector’s items, possibly due to their sheer awesomeness. Gassers were heavily modified gas-guzzling drag racers. During the 1950s, the 1957 Chevy may have been the king of the Gassers, which may have been an inspiration for this Hot Wheels car. They are typically priced between $1,000 and $1,400.

Candy Striper Chevy Bel Air Gasser From 1955

Candy Striper Chevy Bel Air Gasser From 1955

White Porsche Carrera/P-911 From 1975 – $1,140

This 1975 Redline is a white version of the sleek P-911 with red and blue racing stripes. It’s quite difficult to come by, and the one that found on ebay was a little battered. However, despite its “good” condition, it fetched $1,142.18 at auction. That means that an improved version of one of these diecast cars should be able to find purchasers willing to pay extra for the miniature replica. There is also a gold version available, but it was never sold in shops and is believed to have been reserved for Mattel employees.

White Porsche Carrera:P 911 From 1975 $1,000

White Porsche Carrera:P 911 From 1975 $1,140

White Mustang Stocker From 1975 – $1,300

The Hot Wheels 1975 Mustang Stocker is rooted on the 1969-1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302, which has been equipped with a small-block 5.0L V8 engine and was built for Trans-Am competition. When the Boss 302 was introduced in 1969, it retailed for $3,702, or about $26,000 in today’s dollars. That’s approximately 20 of these 1:64-inch scale Hot Wheels replicas. On eBay, one of these Stockers in excellent condition sold for $1,299.

White Mustang Stocker From 1975 $1,300

White Mustang Stocker From 1975 $1,300

Magenta Sugar Caddy From 1971 – $1,330

The 1971 Sugar Caddy is a widely known Redline, with the magenta colorway being the most difficult to come by. This vehicle was only available in Hong Kong. The Sugar Caddy’s body is derived from the 1969 Custom Eldorado, which was itself derived from the 1967 Cadillac Eldorado.

Magenta Sugar Caddy From 1971 $1,330

Magenta Sugar Caddy From 1971 $1,330

Orange Custom T-Bird From 1968 – $1,350

The Ford Thunderbird is one of most widely recognized classic automobiles, and the Hot Wheels model that accompanies it can still fetch a tidy sum at auction. The differences between the US and Hong Kong versions of this item are minor, with the US version having slightly different front fenders and hood gaps and the Hong Kong version lacking an interior dashboard. Although the orange color of this custom T-Bird is one of the most sought after, other colors, such as the United States olive, are likely to fetch a premium. On eBay, this item sold for $1,350.

Orange Custom T Bird From 1968 $1,350

Orange Custom T Bird From 1968 $1,350

Volkswagen Custom (No Sunroof) From 1968 – $1,500

This rare Hot Wheels lacks plastic side windows and has a modified interior. (White is the most common color; dark is uncommon.) According to Zarnock, the majority of these automobiles are blue, with a few in orange, red, green, copper, and green enamel. Additionally, inspect the car’s undercarriage for the number of rivets — genuine Hong Kong models have only one. While you search for a unicorn without a sunroof, this one, in its blister pack, commands a hefty premium.

Volkswagen Custom 9No Sunroof) From 1968 $1,500

Volkswagen Custom (No Sunroof) From 1968 $1,500

 Diamond-Encrusted Custom Otto From 2008 – $60,000

With an average value of more than $100,000, you’d assume it’s encrusted in diamonds or something. Indeed, it is! Mattel chose a unique way to commemorate their 40th anniversary. Additionally, it went all out. The car is made of 18-karat white gold and is encrusted with 2,700 diamonds. The taillights are made of red rubies, and it comes with a custom-made diamond case. The Custom Otto was appreciated at $140,000 and fetched $60,000 at auction.

 Diamond Encrusted Custom Otto From 2008 $60,000

Diamond Encrusted Custom Otto From 2008 $60,000

Vintage Racing John Morton BRE Datsun 510 – $1,500

In past years, the 510 castings has matched the fervent response to the Camaro and Gasser, inspiring numerous multi-hundred-dollar values for hard-to-find variants and serious dollars for rare and iconic examples. If we had to choose just one 510 models to feature, it would have to be the excellent BRE-liveried Datsun 510 from the 2011 Vintage Racing set. This period-correct Hot Wheel is one of the most sought-after of the last decade, regularly selling for between $700 and $1,500, depending on status.

Vintage Racing John Morton BRE Datsun 510 $1,500

Vintage Racing John Morton BRE Datsun 510 $1,500

RLC Shelby Cobra 427 S/C Commemorative Edition – $500-$1,000

Yet another one of Hot Wheels’ all-time classics, the Shelby Cobra is a crowd favourite, and values have steadily increased since the initial run of 4,000 Commemorative Edition Cobras sold out. Prepare to write a check between $500 and $1,000 to acquire one of these Spectraflame Blue roadsters for your collection, depending on condition and serial number.

RLC Shelby Cobra 427 S/C Commemorative Edition - $500-$1,000

RLC Shelby Cobra 427 S/C Commemorative Edition – $500-$1,000

Volkswagen Drag Bus – $1,000++

Similar to the Gasser and 510, the Volkswagen Drag Bus is one of the most popular Hot Wheels castings of all time. Many of the more common variants are available for under $25, but as is the case with the majority of limited editions of popular castings, the rare stuff commands a premium. Given the length of the list of rare Drag Bus variations, we’re unable to provide an accurate price range, but the majority of the rarer ones sell for more than $200, and we’ve seen them top out at bids exceeding $1,000 on eBay.

Volkswagen Drag Bus $1,000++

Volkswagen Drag Bus $1,000++

Mad Maverick Base From 1970 – $15,000

The 1970 Mad Maverick with a ‘Mad Maverick’ base is the fifth most pricey Hot Wheels car. Howard Rees designed the car, which is based on the 1969 Ford Maverick. It premiered in 1970 and was produced until 1977. What makes this model unique is what lies beneath the body. Only a few models with the name ‘Mad Maverick’ cast into the baseplate are known to exist. Due to copyright concerns, the name was changed, thereby increasing the value of all previously named Hot Wheels models.

Mad Maverick Base From 1970 $15,000

Mad Maverick Base From 1970 $15,000

Collector Number 271 Funny Car From 1955 – $3,500

There are really only 12 of these cars believed to exist. There had been a printing error, and provided that cards are printed on 12-sided sheets, it is believed that the error affected only one sheet. Blue with a white number on the sheet. What’s the good news? Only six have been discovered carded. Which means that if you happen to be digging through your collection and come across one of these odd cars still on card, you’re in luck. You could face a fine of up to $3,500!

Collector Number 271 Funny Car From 1955 $3,500

Collector Number 271 Funny Car From 1955 $3,500

White Enamel Camaro From 1968 – $2,500

Camaros are fantastic automobiles, which is why Mattel chose to model the very first Hot Wheels. Hot Wheels released 16 different car models that year, but the white Camaro is allegedly extremely rare, with only 35 cars ever known to exist. These are said to sell for at least ten times the going rate. However, buyers must exercise caution if they come across this Camaro. Numerous forgeries of white enamel paint have been discovered. There is a way to verify these facts prior to proceeding.

White Enamel Camaro From 1968 $2,500

White Enamel Camaro From 1968 $2,500

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